Yelp is Broken and Social Flashmobs Apparently Rule

I was just reading about the social media meltdown of Amy’s Baking Company in Scottsdale, if you’re not familiar with it, the restaurant was featured on Chef Gordon Ramsay’s Kitchen Nightmares production that airs on the FOX Network. To give you a quick recap, things did not go well for the owners of the restaurant and for the second time since Ramsay has been doing the show, he walked away and essentially refused to help the restauranteurs out.  This act in and of itself says a lot since in his own right, Ramsay can be pretty irascible. So for something to essentially send him packing, when we know what he’s capable of, it had to be pretty bad. Suffice it to say, the owners of this restaurant, took it to another level via these  Kitchen Nightmare Youtube videos.

Watching the videos of the show you can see why. But, not surprisingly, I found out about the particular show via social media. Why? Because the buzz of the show, the videos and of what the owners did  started to play itself out on Facebook.  When that happens, things can move quicker than an Arizona brushfire in July.  So quickly that the brush fires moved over from Facebook to Yelp and Reddit as well.

The gist or the fuel? Apparently the owners decided to respond to the trolls that were commenting about how bad they came off on the show.  This doesn’t absolve the restaurant owners but it does highlight the typical flash mob actions that occur on social networks.  Give them anything and they will run with it. More importantly however, it highlighted something else.

Here comes my point and it’s about Yelp.

Yelp may not be the go-to source for restaurant reviews.

Why? Well, The ABC restaurant has 1131 reviews, some of which might be good, but most are not. 99.9% are snarky, mean, negative “reviews. ” The point?  How many of those 1131 reviewers actually ate at the restaurant and how many just piled on for some good old flash mob social media bashing? 99.9%

What can Yelp do about that? Doesn’t that mean you can go and bash any restaurant, anywhere? Seems like it to me.  Unless I’m missing something.

Help me to understand.

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Viral Video #76: KTLA Reporter Eric Spillman learns a quick lesson

This video just shows that someone, for the sake of entertainment, assumed he knew his audience better than he actually did. He thus gets smoked in one of the top 5 television markets.

Viral Video #234

This video was sent to me via email and naturally I sent it on, because that’s what we do. But computer graphics notwithstanding, this is still a pretty cool, “wow” type of video.

 

One world and where the hell is matt?

I have to give props to Peter Shankman on this one. As soon as I saw this video, it made me smile and then think that maybe the world we live isn’t so messed up as we think it is. All anyone wants is a warm meal, a roof over their head and something to smile about every day. Suffice it to say, the below video accomplishes 1 of 3.

I write as much about marketing and social media as the next person, but every once in awhile you have to lay down the pen, the judgement, the criticism and just realize, at the end of the day, it’s important to smile. Thanks Matt  for being extraordinarily ordinary.

 

 

Viral Message. When marketers hope we get it. Did you?

Here is a) a great message b) a video that has the potential to be viral and c) Is well done. .When you get to the end of the video, is it what you thought the message would be?

The Moonwalking Bear

This is courtesy of Dothetest

 Imagine…
A passer-by asks you for directions. As you talk to him, two workmen walk between you carrying a door. In a flash the passer-by switches places with one of the workmen, and you are left giving directions to a different person. Do you think you would notice?

Researchers at Harvard University played this trick on some unsuspecting people and over 50 per cent failed to spot the change.

This phenomenon is known as “change blindness” – only a tiny fraction of all the information going into your brain enters your consciousness. People often fail to see a change in their surroundings because their attention is elsewhere.

Even stranger, if you are concentrating on something, you can become blind to other events that you would normally notice. This “inattention blindness” is possibly the reason why motorists collide with cyclists.

Just as it is important for road users to keep an eye out for cyclists, cyclists must also take steps to ensure they are seen by motorists.