Archive for April, 2011

The Distraction Economy

I admit I have some sort of Social Media ADD but it’s not my fault. I blame it on the emergence of multi-platform, multi-channel and multi-device access to me, to you and to them. There are too many places to find content, curate content, share content and consume content. There are too many places to have conversations, to read conversations and to lurk without having conversations.  I can’t scale and neither can you.

This has nothing to do with Dunbar’s number.  Dunbar was talking about relationships, I’m talking about the pull for your attention. It’s funny, but the reality is that it isn’t as much about me or you as  you might think it is. The desire to have you “In  Network”  is as much about YOU as it is about your personal data.  It might not even be predicated on your actual participation as much as you might think. But nevertheless, at the end of the day-Your presence, your bio, your participation, your video, your pic, your blog post, your quote, your tweet, your status update, your opinion, your recommendation, and or your location is what’s needed. Today. Right Now.

This isn’t the attention economy, this is the “Distraction Economy”.  You know I’m right, you just don’t have time to respond, but you’ll probably share this and maybe tweet it.

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What Twitter could learn from Facebook Deals

I know that the comparisons between Facebook and Twitter are not justified. Facebook is really about developing deeper relationships with friends and family whereas Twitter is more about sharing and consuming information with people in a quick and easy fashion. There are other similarities but the fact is they are different. Their UI’s are pretty different.

But in 2012 you cannot mention social media without a reference to 1) Facebook and 2) Twitter. But if we’re to compare the adaptive growth of the two over the last few years, Twitter came out of the blocks fast and Facebook has been consistently building major momentum as of late.

Here’s the rub though…

Twitter has appeared to have stalled with it’s growth, it’s user adoption and new features, while Facebook continues to enhance it’s feature set at a rapid rate.

The latest case in point: Facebook Deals Facebook Deals has been designed to let the site’s 600 million plus users easily share their shopping experiences with one another. The deals may show up on a users’ news feed, or in ads on the dashboard on the left. Users can buy the deal with a credit card, or share it or like it.

The new service is Facebook’s latest  attempt to tap into the multibillion-dollar market for daily deals online and additionally adds the element of commerce  as well as further keeping their users “in network” on Facebook. 

This latest addition to Facebook further amplifies Facebook’s  proactive moves in regards to what it sees in the social media space. When Facebook sees what users “like and do” in social networks, they quickly incorporate those features into it’s own network. Remember when Facebook changed it’s wall into a virtual Twitter feed of your Friend’s activities?  Why did Facebook create Places? To adress and fold in what Foursquare, Gowalla, Loopt and others had accomplished. And now Facebook has created Deals

What has Twitter done? Dialed down the API from third party developers, changed their UI and have added features that Facebook has. I realize that Twitter and Facebook are different but Twitter had had just as much of an opportunity to change the lanscape of social platforms and communications as Facebook has.

HeyTwitter, don’t you know the first tenet of social media is to listen and monitor your customers and competition and then turn that into actionable outcomes?

Is social media territorial? Should it be?

I was walking the dog the other night and watched as he “marked” his territory and naturally I thought about the  natural Tug-o-War that occurs with social. The desire for different departments wanting to own the “rights” to social media. Why do you think that is? Look at how strongly some people feel about the subject!

Danny Wong, the co-founder and Lead Evangelist for Blank Label says that PR should own social media because that department knows “what the appropriate messages are for the company’s followers.”

According to Chris Koch’s B2B Marketing Blog He just comes right out and states, It’s official: Marketing owns social media management, in which I agree with his next question, Now what?

Chris Kieff strongly believes, as usual, that it’s the bailiwick of the HR department and that HR should own social media; and if you don’t think there’s an opinion on that, look at the responses he got to his post

Lastly, Steve Radick thinks we all own social media. Wait cancel that, he thinks no one owns social media.

Now I’m confused.

But let’s think about this for a second. A dog marks his territory every day. The same territory every day. Why does he do that? Because another dog came along and marked the exact same territory as his own as well. This happens every day without fail. So the dog marking dance happens every day without fail. Sniff, then mark. Over and over and over again.

It’s simple really, it’s  not about ownership, it’s about establishing that you as an organization, are consistently there every day,  and making sure others know that you were there…every day, and that you are going to be there…every day. That’s all consumers want.

What Can P90X Teach Us About Social Digital Principles?

In case you may be living under a rock and do not know what P90X is, it’s currently the media darling of the fitness world. It’s a fitness program encapsulated on DVD in which it stresses 3 simple core principles into it’s workout regime. The core principles are grounded in intensity, variety and consistency.

So I thought, can we make a correlation between P90X and social? Or marketing either online or offline?

The answer is absolutely. Let’s take a quick look.

First, I did a search on Intensity and pulled these colloquial terms:

All of them make sense, but when I think of intensity in digital/social media marketing, I think of focus.

Next up is Variety, which would seemingly fly in the face of focus, but not necessarily. To me, variety means keeping things fresh, not only from a marketing standpoint but also from the standpoint of giving you and your employees and your customers, a reason to come to work, do the work and buy the work. Variety is a two way street.

Lastly we have one of the four pillars of life in my opinion. Consistency. Do you want to succeed? Do you want to win? Do you want to overcome? It’s all about reps. Being consistent with your routine, with your messaging, with your offers, with your conversations, with your content, with your employees and most importantly with your customers. In sports, we marvel at how good it appears that some athletes are-we don’t realize how hard they practiced and worked in order to be consistent.

What principles guide you?

When Should Brands Establish Credibility in Social?

The answer to the title of this post is now, but how are they supposed to do that? What does social credibility look like on the brand side? Is it a Facebook and Twitter presence? A Blog? An internal social media strategy? A go to market strategy? Hiring a social media director? What should credibility look like for a brand in the not so new social space? Is it  accruing  a massive numbers of followers and fans? At what point is a brand legit in social media?

There is an old adage that goes like this-To get a job you need experience, with the response being… “but how can I get the experience without the job”? So how or when is a brand supposed to go about establishing credibility in social media? What does that look like? What is the line of demarcation for when a brand is accepted as being social. We need to ease up on the castigation of brands that move too slow in social media. Let’s let it marinate first. I know some will say if not now then when but…

At some point you were new to…

Qualify the Why

Why do people buy your product?

Why do you buy one product and not the other?

Why do people hate you or your company?

Why do people love your product?

Why do people quit using your product?

Why do people talk about your products and company?

Qualify the why and then you can begin to understand the motivation of intent.

Should Companies Play it Safe in Social Media?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What does that mean exactly, to play it safe? Is that creating a Facebook page just to satisfy the critics and the bashers? Is it creating a Twitter profile “in case” someone maybe be talking about you so that you can claim that you and your company are proactively listening to the conversation?  Or is it a blog that has 3-4 posts over the span of 6 months?  Maybe, possibly, and perhaps?

One of the easiest ways to opt out of the social media revolution is to do just enough to satisfy the hacks that may be looking at your social efforts who then may be writing, speaking or commenting about your stuff and trying to poke holes at it. To be honest, if I was a company who didn’t have money, resources, or time (weak excuse) to dip a toe into the waters of social, I might do the same thing. Of course doing the barest of minimums also sets you up for the hacks who love to point out the companies who…do the barest of minimums. Or…doing the barest of minimums sets you up for nothing.

So what’s happening here?  Call it paralysis by analysis. Fear of talking, orRO-myopia. But the fact of the matter is that some organizations are so fixated on social but so unsure of what to do, or so obsessed with a wait and see mode, that they end up doing nothing or prefer to just sit back and do very little. Ironically they then claim that they are social, or that they’re doing nothing, because they’re waiting for things to sort themselves out.

Does either strategy ( I use the term lightly) work? Not really. Does it buy you time compared to your comptetitors? Maybe. You see, the easiset way that you could  measure your efforts in social would be to first measure how you’re doing compared to the competition. When I coach basketball and baseball- I want to know who is the best and why. Amazing players aside, preparation can go a long way. Once my teams are suitably prepared, we measure where we are by competing. Then I know exactly where to focus my practices and future game plans.

You’re in business to make money and you’re in business to compete against others that do what you do and sell what you sell. Do you scout them? How do you compare to them? What are you doing to improve what you do, as it compares to what they do? What makes you better than them? What are they doing with social media that you are not?

Playing it safe in sports means playing for ties or not caring whether you win or lose. If that was what mattered, then we wouldn’t have to keep score or root for any teams. In business we keep score by making money and surviving.  Social used the right way, could determine both.


The Deets

Marc Meyer is a Digital and Social Media Strategist at DRMG. This is my personal blog where I share observations, thoughts and opinions that are all my own.

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